must-have accessories for starter?

Hello,

I’m new to 3d printing and just ordered a Taz 5. I’m hoping that the community can help me know if there are any must-have accessories or tools I should get to go along with my new machine. I’m looking for the basics to get started successfully.

Thanks!

You will want a good set of digital vernier calipers to measure filliment and parts for calibration. The taz comes with a tool bag that will have things like Allen wrenches for machine adjustments so you wont need to go get those. A good part removal tool is also useful to have. I personally use a calephon gadgets cheese slicer wedge with the slicy bit filed off and taped over for that.

You will also want to find a thin piece of metal, about the thickness of a business card to use as a bed leveling feeler gauge since you always want to adjust bed height to a nozzle at print temperature since they expand.

Optionally, a cheap point and shoot infrared thermometer is a good investment to check bed and nozzle temperatures against what the computer thinks they are for troubleshooting. A electrical multimeter comes in handy as well but you shouldn’t need either of those right away.

For part finishing, a good carving knife is useful for removing excess plastic. A tandy leather #4 edging tool also works well for edge cleanup. A plastic debarring tool also helps. You may also want a radio control car body hole reaming tool to clean up hole edges. I also keep a cheap set of drill bits by the printer that I can use as a hand drill reamer to clean out printed holes. A flat file can also be useful for edge cleanup.

Welcome to the printer club!

Super, and thanks!

You will want a good set of digital vernier calipers to measure filliment and parts for calibration.
There seems to be a pretty broad range of tools…Something like this looks like reasonable quality, and not too expensive?: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001AQEZ2W

You will also want to find a thin piece of metal, about the thickness of a business card to use as a bed leveling feeler gauge since you always want to adjust bed height to a nozzle at print temperature since they expand.
Would something like these feeler gauges work well? http://www.amazon.com/OEMTools-25025-Blade-Master-Feeler/dp/B000BYGIR4/

Optionally, a cheap point and shoot infrared thermometer is a good investment to check bed and nozzle temperatures against what the computer thinks they are for troubleshooting.
Super…I do my cooking like a geek, so I’ve got one of those already!

One question…should I buy replacement nozzles in advance, and from where? I didn’t see any on the lulzbot store…just entire print heads, which seems excessive. I presume that they’ll go bad with use, especially if I play with some of the ‘exotic’ materials.

Welcome to the printer club!
Thanks, the whole family is looking forward to modeling and manufacturing now!

That caliper set should work fine. Be sure and grab a few extra batteries for it while you are at it too. They last pretty long, but it’s never fun when they run out right in the middle of a project.

The feeler gauges should work great. I actually use a thin metal ruler.

Replacement nozzles are probably not necessary right away, unless you plan on printing the more abrasive filliments, like the laywood or laybrick wood or stone filliments, or things like bronzefill. You can use a hexagon print nozzle or an E3d nozzle interchangably. They have them on Amazon, or places like matterhackers.com. I would really reccommend putting together a second “print exotic stuff only” print head once you get set up, and as budget allows rather than use the same one for everything.

be sure and take a trip through thingiverse.com to start collecting things you want to print!

I think they supply one of these in the toolkit. Business cards work fine in a pinch… but a metal feeler is ideal for consistency.

Dial guages help quantify distances when leveling the bed. I use these dial gauges with this [urlhttps://www.thingiverse.com/thing:731620]clip[/url].

I’m sure that this will make more sense once I get the device in front of me (should be another day or two), and go through the leveling process, but how exactly does this setup work?
It looks like it attaches this gauge to the print head, and you measure at each corner to ensure that at each corners the print head is a uniform distance from the bed. Do you leave this permanently attached? How often do you level the bed? Every time you start a print?

This gives me something to make, and lets me become a “modder” heh.

It will make more sense when you get the machine in front of you, but you’re on track.

The dial gauges attach to either side of the tool head (what you’re calling the print head… which is actually the extruder, hotend and carrier). Measure the distance to each corner of the bed… get all the corners equal.

Remove the dial gauge(s) when you’re done leveling the bed.

The bed doesn’t need to be leveled that often… just when you change a nozzle, switch toolheads or if prints aren’t sticking on one-side/corner… etc. For me it seems to be a once a month-ish. The PEI bed is really nice and forgiving, ABS sticks to it pretty well once the nozzle height is dialed in.

Each time you finish a print, examine the bottom (surface against bed). The striations from the extruded filament, usually tells you if the bed may need leveling.


Here’s my method:
DSC02532.JPG
Using two dial guages just makes things quicker. Set the front corners, set the rear corners, then go back to check the front corners again. Regardless of the number of dial guages, make sure to home XY then move the toolhead to the center of X before attaching the guages.


EDIT: Get yourself a nice set of locking [urlhttp://www.amazon.com/Hemostats-Curved-5-Straight/dp/B00IJCGKR8/ref=pd_sim_328_5?ie=UTF8&dpID=31%2B24QisPCL&dpSrc=sims&preST=AC_UL160_SR160%2C160&refRID=1R6EEB2N6T530T5947S4]forceps[/url]. Good for grabbing that stub of filament when you smoke the filament spool to the nub. You’ll get tweezers in the tool kit which will work to grab the filament also. But the locking forceps get into the tight space and lock on to the filament stub allowing you to pull it out. Its another one of those things you’ll understand better when you get the machine.