What should we make next?

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mirage335
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by mirage335 » Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:00 am

i-t-w.com wrote:What market will you serve?
"industrial fabrication / high training threshold"
or
"entry to mid level / easy to use"
AlephObjects really has unique potential to head towards the "industrial fabrication" market. Their best-in-class 3D printers already demonstrate excellent engineering choices. As well, they have a strong R&D track record. However, since the basic technology is still the same, the training threshold really should not be much higher.

Much integration work has already been done by the community to allow users to control their machine and slice g-code with a variety of engines, all from one interface. Going a bit further, CNC milling/lasing toolpath generators could be included as well. In fact, laser cutters commonly present themselves as USB/network printers, which could be provided by CUPS support. Newbies would be able to slice acrylic routinely as printing photos. Throwing in a RaspberryPi to ship a tightly integrated, maintainable platform, would be well worthwhile.

Most importantly, the community itself is already providing the education. Here, on the forums, many questions have been given detailed answers. At hackerspaces worldwide, the public is getting hands-on traning and encouragement. Catering to what people *will do* is much better than what people *are doing* now.
i-t-w.com wrote:Host a Cura hackathon...
Speaking for myself, Slic3r is nicer. Cura does not handle multi-extrusion situations well at all. Fast visualization of support material is also a crucial feature.

Sebastian
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by Sebastian » Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:09 am

mirage335 wrote:
i-t-w.com wrote:Host a Cura hackathon...
Speaking for myself, Slic3r is nicer. Cura does not handle multi-extrusion situations well at all. Fast visualization of support material is also a crucial feature.
I was thinking the same when I read that. I think Slic3r needs some debugging and a more "funky" user interface to be accepted by newcommers, but the features of it's engine are way beyond Cura. I don't know why, but Slic3r is a one man show until now. If I could, I would invest in Slic3r..

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mirage335
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by mirage335 » Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:16 am

+1
Try the latest source code for Slic3r from GitHub for fewer bugs though. At the very least, they seem to have fixed the numbers duplicating in all fields when configuring multiple extruders.

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piercet
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by piercet » Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:42 pm

ttabbal wrote:
Filament width and feed rate sensor. Automatically compensating for diameter changes and detecting stripped filament would be nice. Even better if doing so would allow one to fix the filament and resume the print.
I'm working on that, I'm just behind. whatever I come up with wil be open source so that one is pretty much garunteed to be available here shortly.

ttabbal
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by ttabbal » Sun Feb 28, 2016 5:35 pm

piercet wrote:
ttabbal wrote:
Filament width and feed rate sensor. Automatically compensating for diameter changes and detecting stripped filament would be nice. Even better if doing so would allow one to fix the filament and resume the print.
I'm working on that, I'm just behind. whatever I come up with wil be open source so that one is pretty much garunteed to be available here shortly.
Very cool. I'm looking forward to seeing what you come up with. Hopefully mini users can play too. :mrgreen:

Gbleck
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by Gbleck » Mon Feb 29, 2016 4:41 pm

cnc mill attachment would be cool as would a filament recycler.

daggius
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by daggius » Mon Feb 29, 2016 8:12 pm

make directions for modifying lulzbot mini to put damper on every stepper motor so it is much more quiet

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mirage335
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by mirage335 » Tue Mar 01, 2016 9:44 pm

A more comprehensive integrated electronics platform might be nice. Such things as adding a USB host connector to power RasPi's, integrated logic supply battery backup (excluding heated bed), mounting holes for standard 40mm heatsinks on the stepper drivers, XT60 power connectors on the PCB itself (maybe as optional unpopulated footprints), and perhaps even an 80-conductor IDE connector to support breakout boards.

suntorn
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by suntorn » Sat Mar 05, 2016 6:31 am

Biolumo wrote:Well, since AO had officially announced a few years back (one source is Hackaday, saw it somewhere else too) that they would be planning on selling a version of a Lyman Filament Extruder i vote for them to continue development on that. I dont know if there is any interest in that anymore or if it's really all that economical. But AO said they would make one, so they should keep their word.

Personally i think you should experiment in the CNC mill / lazer engraver market. Sure it's crowded, but you already have some of the expertise with such a device already. Not sure what other hardware based things you should get into, but there is definitely room for expansion in several areas. Perhaps partner even more with SparkFun electronics where they make your electronics (like your own Rambo boards) and you make hardware that they want. Better and cheaper 3D scanners perhaps. Perhaps also experiment with larger and other types of 3d printers (like resin).

from a open source software perspective someone pumping huge funding and/or hiring lots of programmers to develop open source CAD is desperately needed. The only viable and user friendly CAD in my opinion is Solidworks. But it is expensive, not open, and tied to a non-open operating system (not cross platform). Despite this it is still my software of choice even though i am a native linux user, and even AO has used it extensively to design the lulzbot mini. Freecad has potential, but it sucks. It's interface is clunky and does not have an intuitive interface like solidworks. Blender is beautiful 3d software, but it's way to complex and is not designed with CAD use in mind. If someone could take the beauty and elegance of blender, mix in a little bit of freecad and then top it off with the best features of Solidworks we would have a winner.
Have you tried autodesk 123d design? I tried so many different programs, and was not impressed, so about 6 months ago I downloaded a free copy of 123d design, and now I can model any complex designs in minutes, with ease. I love this program, and they updated out with many new features.

suntorn
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by suntorn » Sat Mar 05, 2016 6:37 am

piercet wrote:Have you guys contemplated making an actual opensource replacement for thingiverse? It would be a massive investment in infrastructure and knowledge, with an uncertain payoff, but I think the community would trust an open source company not to abuse their models more than certain other ones. You would have to commit to doing it right though. If it isn't as polished as thingiverse and as easy to use at launch, it won't gain market share.

I'm not sure if it would monitize well except as a product advertisement page, but it would offer a huge amount of visibility and give you a public perception of being as large as makerbot in the eye of the general public. None of the other alternatives out there really get the model down right. There are either too many steps, or the pages are slow or glitchy. Mind you thingiverse has huge room for improvement itself, but even with their licensing sillyness, they remain the most usable option.

A website with a drag and drop part upload interface and better support for model instruction formatting that didn't crash and had a useable search feature that actually returns the items you are searching for the first time when you search for an exact item by name that had a rock solid garuntee of continued opensource content and no moves to grab control of uploaded parts would eventually take over. I just don't know if the intangable benifit would be worth the capital to make it work. It is for stratsys and makerbot, but it would be hard to show an actual correlation on profit before and after it was implemented due to the whole history of how that came about.
I second this! I despise thingiverse, and makerbot. I would use and contribute so much to a lulzland!

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