nGen De-lamination Problem

Help with printing with specific plastic filaments.
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ktwelch
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2018 6:42 am

nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by ktwelch » Thu May 10, 2018 8:38 am

Hey All!

So I bought a few spools of Colorfab's 2.85mm nGen Amphora Co-Polyester because I have heard good things about the prints and ease of use. However, I am running into one issue. When I print an object, the layers seen weakly bonded and thin sections like walls can be pulled apart with not too much effort. I'm using the stock Cura nGen profile. Thoughts?

Thanks,
Kevin

Galadriel
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Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by Galadriel » Sat May 12, 2018 2:10 am

Could you post some photos of the prints in question? This sounds like under extrusion to me but there are a couple things that can cause under extrusion and seeing some photos might help narrow that down a bit.

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kyle vick
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Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by kyle vick » Sat May 12, 2018 12:08 pm

What temp are you printing at?
My bed is 87C and the extruder is 230C.

Layer height too thick?

ktwelch
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2018 6:42 am

Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by ktwelch » Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:19 pm

Having printed with several colors of the nGen now this problem only seems present on the metalic silver color. I wonder if there is something in the coloring that contributes to this. All other colors (black, red, green) print perfectly on the stock cura profile.

Galadriel
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Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by Galadriel » Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:12 pm

ktwelch wrote:
Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:19 pm
Having printed with several colors of the nGen now this problem only seems present on the metalic silver color. I wonder if there is something in the coloring that contributes to this. All other colors (black, red, green) print perfectly on the stock cura profile.
This could certainly be playing a roll. Certain colors do react differently because of the pigments in them. I will often need to slightly reduce print temps when using white, I assume this is because they frequently use titanium dioxide as a white pigment. It would make sense for metallic filaments to have similar difficulties. The stock profile in Cura tries to create the best middle ground for the full range of that filament which means there will sometimes be a few outliers that need adjusted settings.

DirkWiggley
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Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by DirkWiggley » Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:28 pm

That's interesting, I was about to use a spool of white for the first time. Could you post your temperature settings so I could use them?

Regards,

Tim
Galadriel wrote:
Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:12 pm
ktwelch wrote:
Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:19 pm
Having printed with several colors of the nGen now this problem only seems present on the metalic silver color. I wonder if there is something in the coloring that contributes to this. All other colors (black, red, green) print perfectly on the stock cura profile.
This could certainly be playing a roll. Certain colors do react differently because of the pigments in them. I will often need to slightly reduce print temps when using white, I assume this is because they frequently use titanium dioxide as a white pigment. It would make sense for metallic filaments to have similar difficulties. The stock profile in Cura tries to create the best middle ground for the full range of that filament which means there will sometimes be a few outliers that need adjusted settings.

Galadriel
Aleph Objects | LulzBot
Posts: 258
Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:23 am

Re: nGen De-lamination Problem

Post by Galadriel » Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:24 pm

DirkWiggley wrote:
Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:28 pm
That's interesting, I was about to use a spool of white for the first time. Could you post your temperature settings so I could use them?

Regards,

Tim
I don't have a specific temperature that I have used when working with white Ngen to share unfortunately, this is just a general thing that I have noticed across pretty much every type filament I have worked with. Titanium dioxide is just a very common substance to use as white pigment and it is a metal byproduct so my thinking is it just holds the heat better. In general I usually start by reducing the temperature by 5C and running a test to see how it does then adjust it a bit more if it seems necessary.

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