Brand new at this stuff

A forum dedicated to the stock LulzBot TAZ 3D Printer
D.Huber
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2016 11:33 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by D.Huber » Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:00 pm

I'm with John MC, I live on a farm and do my own repairs, I have more than enough things that need hitting with a sledge hammer that I don't really need to go out of my way to make something to demolish :-) lets say we needed to make a small gear for a powered sausage stuffer that had gotten stripped out.....what material would be best in this case? suppose we had a smooth shaft with plastic bushings sliding along it and new bushings were required.... what material? Maybe a dewalt battery pack that had been dropped and the case broken and a new case were to be made? And a current project that just came to mind ....A tooth pick in case of a bit of beef jerky stuck between your teeth.

If I want to do a sledge hammer test I would make something out of PH 13-8 stainless or perhaps some TI 37-5 or even some AMS 4640 and measure the dent in the hammer after the swing :-)

While working with a single extruder how does a person handle support material?

does the cat shield that I see on this forum constitute a adequate enclosure for heat retention? My cat knows better than to go near my stuff, besides she is much too busy dodging being kicked to get into much trouble

Sorry if I am asking to many silly questions but my new toy does not arrive until Wednesday and I am NOT the definition of patience in the dictionary.

Is there any word out yet when the dual extruder will be available? yeah I know learn on a stock machine and then expand.....but I cant think of very many things that I want to make that won't need support.

last question for now

the PEI layer and other bed materials what is the purpose of these different materials? is It to protect the bed? is it for different plastics?

wmgeorge64
Posts: 410
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 7:28 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by wmgeorge64 » Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:31 pm

While working with a single extruder how does a person handle support material?
Its generated when you select it in either CURA or Simplify 3D and with S3D you can add manual supports when needed. When I had my TAZ
CURA did an excellent job.

does the cat shield that I see on this forum constitute a adequate enclosure for heat retention? My cat knows better than to go near my stuff, besides she is much too busy dodging being kicked,
Unless your printing large objects or in a cold drafty room, you don't really need it for ABS, you see my posts on PETG no need to rehash. My Cat has yet to learn the lessons of a spray bottle or being wacked .

Sorry if I am asking to many silly questions but my new toy does not arrive until Wednesday and I am NOT the definition of patience in the dictionary. Learning 3D printing is an exercise in patience.... I don't care which brand or model. The really harder part for me was learning the 3D drawing, spent years doing 2D but the 3D modeling for an old dog took time.

Is there any word out yet when the dual extruder will be available? yeah I know learn on a stock machine and then expand.....but I cant think of very many things that I want to make that won't need support.
See answer above about support.

last question for now

the PEI layer and other bed materials what is the purpose of these different materials? is It to protect the bed? is it for different plastics? The PEI does away with the need for hair spray, glue sticks and ABS Juice.
ULS Laser . Retired master Electrician in Iowa USA Lots of Hobbies

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CoParaTech
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2015 6:09 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by CoParaTech » Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:58 pm

Here's my 2 cents, which at this point may only be worth a penny. From a relative newbie perspective, this is what I've learned about jumping into 3D printing. Give yourself some time to learn the ins and outs of your new machine. The best way I found to do that was to start with the most beginner friendly filament and print everything imaginable. HIPS and PLA are the ones to start out with. At first I was trying to print with all kinds of plastics before I even new what I was doing. That didn't work out so well.

Get a roll or two of HIPS and print small to medium sized geometric shapes with Cura until they come out perfect. There will be a lot of tweaking to do until you get to what you feel is a good print. As you learn Cura, HIPS, and your machine, you are learning things that will help when you move into more advanced filaments which all have their different special requirements and "sweet spots" to print correctly.

Understand that every machine and filament has minor differences so stock setups, unless you are very lucky, are just a starting point. Make very small adjustments in one area at a time and keep notes of all the changes you make. There is a lot to learn, but it's totally worth the effort, and once you've mastered one filament, move on to another and another.

I've only been at this a few months, but now I'm very comfortable with many different types of filaments even though I still have much more to learn. And, of course, if you get stuck, there are always the fine folks here in this forum to help.

Hope that was worth the read and happy printing!

D.Huber
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2016 11:33 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by D.Huber » Mon Feb 29, 2016 1:52 pm

Thanks guys, all reading is good reading... knowledge is power over whatever a person may be trying to do, hence my questions... I do know there is going to be a large learning curve on this and I am not trying to over simplify that... I have been a CNC machinist for most of my 52 years starting out as a simple operator loading parts and pressing start..... all the way though to trainer of new hires as well as CNC programing , in over 39 years I have yet to find a machine that I could not if not master at least be able to say productive yet.... Don't tell anyone but I even taught myself how to run our electronic automatic tape dispenser at work this weekend :-)

3D drawing is something I have struggled with for the last few years until I enrolled into a computer aided Drafting class at a tech college last year....as they say, now it is easy peasy.

so the good news I was wrong when i said my printer gets here on Wednesday....It comes tomorrow (Tuesday) and then I get to start playing and then just wait for the questions....but the filaments don't get here until Wednesday :-( Oh well marry Christmas to me/

wmgeorge64
Posts: 410
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 7:28 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by wmgeorge64 » Mon Feb 29, 2016 3:20 pm

It used to come with a sample piece of filament. So you may have fun and good luck!!
ULS Laser . Retired master Electrician in Iowa USA Lots of Hobbies

kcchen_00
Posts: 1705
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:42 am

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by kcchen_00 » Mon Feb 29, 2016 5:35 pm

D.Huber wrote:...lets say we needed to make a small gear for a powered sausage stuffer that had gotten stripped out.....what material would be best in this case? suppose we had a smooth shaft with plastic bushings sliding along it and new bushings were required.... what material? Maybe a dewalt battery pack that had been dropped and the case broken and a new case were to be made? And a current project that just came to mind ....A tooth pick in case of a bit of beef jerky stuck between your teeth.
I'd use ABS for all those examples... except for the toothpick going in your mouth should be PETG to be "food-safe" (print with a stainless steel nozzle).

PETG has more flex than ABS. Hence, suitable for wmgeorge's license plate holder that's getting banged every so often.

Gear probably needs to be rigid, ABS... I guess in the case of a sausage stuffer it doesn't matter. Plastic shaft, again probably don't want flex, ABS. Battery pack... good toss up, but from a durability perspective a bit of flex might help... if designed with a thick enough housing, I'd still do ABS. :) For ultimate durability you'll want polycarbonate or nylon... which can be more difficult than ABS.

I started out with PLA with a goal for ABS... printing a lot of stuff for RC multirotors and planes. So durability was key for me. Maybe if I had discovered PETG I wouldn't be so hooked on ABS. But, I've dialed both machines in for ABS... never looked back.

Here's a description with pros and cons of filament materials:
http://3dprintingfromscratch.com/common ... -overview/

Maybe in the summer, I'll try some more quantitative controlled tests than a sledgehammer. A consistent designed beam resting between two cinder blocks. Figure out how to rest some weights in the center of the beam. Measure at static load and weight at which each filament type breaks.

wmgeorge64
Posts: 410
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 7:28 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by wmgeorge64 » Mon Feb 29, 2016 7:11 pm

ABS or PETG what difference does it make even if they are both the same strength? I would never give up all the advantages of PETG to go back to ABS on a regular basis.

No I am not throwing away my rolls of ABS its darn good stuff and I still use. But my go to printing filament is PETG I just leave a roll on the printer and its ready.

I would be interested in seeing some testing. My next project will be learning to print with the wood filament!
ULS Laser . Retired master Electrician in Iowa USA Lots of Hobbies

D.Huber
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2016 11:33 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by D.Huber » Mon Feb 29, 2016 11:13 pm

I'm kinda thinking maybe my first three projects to get some experience is three 1/2 X 1/2 by 8 inch sticks of ABS, HIPS and maybe order up a roll of PLA and PETG....suspend and place weights in the center....valid test?

kcchen_00
Posts: 1705
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:42 am

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by kcchen_00 » Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:26 am

wmgeorge64 wrote:ABS or PETG what difference does it make even if they are both the same strength?
Well... the flex. Shaft and linear bearing... you probably don't want flex in the shaft. For gears, flexing teeth equals loss of accuracy. Your license plate holder, a bit of flex is good if banging it is inevitable. :)
D.Huber wrote:I'm kinda thinking maybe my first three projects to get some experience is three 1/2 X 1/2 by 8 inch sticks of ABS, HIPS and maybe order up a roll of PLA and PETG....suspend and place weights in the center....valid test?
Sounds like a good plan... I would hope your 4th print is something more exciting. :) Look forward to the results.

billyd
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 11:06 pm

Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by billyd » Tue Mar 01, 2016 10:16 am

You don't need an enclosure for ABS if you print small parts or don't care if large parts warp like crazy.

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