Brand new at this stuff

A forum dedicated to the stock LulzBot TAZ 3D Printer
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piercet
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by piercet » Tue Mar 01, 2016 10:35 am

With the right bed setup you don't need an enclosure for abs at all.

D.Huber
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by D.Huber » Tue Mar 01, 2016 11:23 pm

So I got my taz5 today set it up and ran the calibration program which was kinda cool... im not sure what I was looking at but it was cool... guess I need to do some more reading. Am now printing out a rocktopus as I type.. seems pretty cool

billyd
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by billyd » Wed Mar 02, 2016 1:19 pm

piercet wrote:With the right bed setup you don't need an enclosure for abs at all.

If sticking to the bed was the only issue that would be true.

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piercet
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by piercet » Wed Mar 02, 2016 3:58 pm

billyd wrote:
piercet wrote:With the right bed setup you don't need an enclosure for abs at all.

If sticking to the bed was the only issue that would be true.
With my printer that is the only issue, and it is true. I print very large crack free abs items on a regular basis. I do not have an enclosure.

billyd
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by billyd » Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:07 pm

piercet wrote:
billyd wrote:
piercet wrote:With the right bed setup you don't need an enclosure for abs at all.

If sticking to the bed was the only issue that would be true.
With my printer that is the only issue, and it is true. I print very large crack free abs items on a regular basis. I do not have an enclosure.
Ok but that is not typical.

D.Huber
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by D.Huber » Thu Mar 03, 2016 1:00 am

20160302_184818.jpg
Okay so someone asked awhile back if a ar15 printed out could just be assembled, the answer is yes... a reamer should be ran though the holes for the pins but other than that very straight forward, I don't think it is going to last very long as a weapon but I wanna try it a bit....and this did not come off my machine but rather the college's Uprint or whatever it is called

So any opinion? can I expect this kind of accuracy with my taz that I see from this UPrint machine?

do You guys using cura normally use expert settings or just go with the standard?

kcchen_00
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by kcchen_00 » Thu Mar 03, 2016 2:33 am

D.Huber wrote: So any opinion? can I expect this kind of accuracy with my taz that I see from this UPrint machine?

do You guys using cura normally use expert settings or just go with the standard?
I was going to say... you've progressed A LOT in your second day of ownership. :)


Yes, you can get extremely accurate parts from the TAZ. It may take a little tweaking to dial in the printer, but absolutely do-able. To get parts to fit make sure to check your e-steps (calibrate), and lower the flow rate to 95-97%.

In cura, start with the standard quickprint profiles. Then learn the expert settings. I don't use Cura, but in my experimenting to help others... I start in quickprint to select the filament material, then switch to full settings to tweak all the options (make sure to transfer the settings from quickprint). Once you start learning how each setting affects your print, save any customization off to profiles. Eventually, you'll build a library of profiles for your common print situations.

Have fun!

smith59
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by smith59 » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:48 am

I'd use ABS for all those examples... except for the toothpick going in your mouth should be PETG to be "food-safe" (print with a stainless steel nozzle).

PETG has more flex than ABS. Hence, suitable for wmgeorge's license plate holder that's getting banged every so often.

Gear probably needs to be rigid, ABS... I guess in the case of a sausage stuffer it doesn't matter. Plastic shaft, again probably don't want flex, ABS. Battery pack... good toss up, but from a durability perspective a bit of flex might help... if designed with a thick enough housing, I'd still do ABS. :) For ultimate durability you'll want polycarbonate or nylon... which can be more difficult than ABS.

I started out with PLA with a goal for ABS... printing a lot of stuff for RC multirotors and planes. So durability was key for me. Maybe if I had discovered PETG I wouldn't be so hooked on ABS. But, I've dialed both machines in for ABS... never looked back.

Here's a description with pros and cons of filament materials:
https://www.3dprintmanual.com/best-3d-printer-filament/

Maybe in the summer, I'll try some more quantitative controlled tests than a sledgehammer. A consistent designed beam resting between two cinder blocks. Figure out how to rest some weights in the center of the beam. Measure at static load and weight at which each filament type breaks.

barretzhnag
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Re: Brand new at this stuff

Post by barretzhnag » Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:44 am

Actually [url https://www.ecoreprap.com/filament/petg-filament/]petg filament[/url] has similar property with ABS, We prefer to use petg with ABS.

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