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Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 1:13 pm
by hamp3007
Hi Chris,

I use Rhino 5 and it's a great program and easy to use. Relatively expensive however, around $800. AutoCAD is $3,500. Solidworks is off the chart. However, if you are in school or in Academia you can get student versions of all three for not much money.
Hamp

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Wed May 25, 2016 7:45 am
by christspringer271
Perfect thread!

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Thu Oct 13, 2016 6:41 am
by mgordeeva250
Wow, so many explanations! What strikes me most is the fact that they explain pretty everything! I mean, for now I don't have even a simple 3D printer, I just came to the idea that it would be much fun using it and started to search for, you know, tips. And found this topic! Thanks a lot! :)

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 7:11 pm
by tonyboutwell
To me it depends on the kinds of things you want to build. Are the hard/angles geometry based or more organic. Each modeling package has their strengths/weakness in those. For more geometric I use cinema 4d and for organic or soft body I use Zbrush. Both of those are expensive but there are lots of free alternatives of each style modeler too.

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 12:35 am
by John Mc
Has anyone tried Sculptris for organic/softbody shapes:

As I understand it, it's a subset of Zbrush (and it's free). I'm wondering how tough it is to learn, or is it fairly intuitive? Looking fo rsomething a few 6th grade kids might be able to learn. They are using TinkerCad right now, there are a few of them who might like to work with something that works with more organic shapes.

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:46 pm
by tonyboutwell
I have just downloaded Kodon...it is an HTC VIVE VR Sculpting program. It is something new they are still working on but is available to work with right now (I think price is $19) and you can actually sculpt like with zbrush...but with much more simplified interface...all IN VR. I am going to play in it a couple hours tonight and let you know if it is any good. I got it mainly for my 12 year old to practice sculpting.

John Mc wrote:Has anyone tried Sculptris for organic/softbody shapes:

As I understand it, it's a subset of Zbrush (and it's free). I'm wondering how tough it is to learn, or is it fairly intuitive? Looking fo rsomething a few 6th grade kids might be able to learn. They are using TinkerCad right now, there are a few of them who might like to work with something that works with more organic shapes.

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 4:09 am
by mariareese
some of them are good websites of tutorials .. helping me out at some points ..thanku ..:D

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:55 am
by jlund
After the now gone Google Sketchup got too simple for me, I found onshape.com with excellent video tutorials build in, and it is highly recommended if you are happy to stick with the free version where all your models are public.

Others I have recommended it to, got up and running the same day.

It is parametric 3D design, with sharing options, stable, and always updated as it runs in the browser - lot's of specialty tools when it gets to that. Great with variants and history - all online.

If the free version is not enough, it would get unrealistically expensive for me. Prices changed drastically to the worse (could happen again) just after I got going with it. Honestly with the pricing today, I would not start with it for that reason, as I might need it professionally in a small company - it's a shame.

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:14 am
by Traevanon
What's gone about Sketchup?

https://www.sketchup.com/

Re: Getting started - 3D Software Recomendations

Posted: Mon May 07, 2018 9:01 pm
by coloradocaleb
My 2ยข (just came across this thread, I know it has a ton of great info already and isn't very active):

tl;dr:

Learn the concepts of 3D modeling and you can use just about any modeling software out there. Some are more intuitive than others (some software is designed/made by programmers, some are designed and made by artists. Oversimplified: programmers make it a little more intuitive, but more technical (Maya, Modo); artists make it a little harder to navigate but focus on final product/detail (zBrush, 3Dcoat.) You can get great results regardless of software but vary in stability, ease of use/learning curve, and in cost from free to several thousands of dollars.

The long:

Modo is my go to (I'm a bit biased, it's what I use for 3D printing work, video game production, and vfx modeling work.) It has a pretty quick learning curve and is very intuitive compared to some of the other stuff. Granted just about all the modeling software is the same with the buttons in different places with the biggest difference being different modifier workflows (3DS Max modifiers vs Maya's history for example.) I've used Maya, Rhino, Cinema 4D, Blender, Sketchup, Wings3D, 3DS Max, zBrush, 123D, 3Dcoat, Mari, Motion Builder, and more for modeling/animation/texturing work + personal projects and Modo has been the easiest just to make stuff without having to fight the software interface and crashes/corrupted files. Maya's new tools for sculpting starting with 2016 aren't bad but Maya is a massive pain in other areas and unless you are doing tons of paid work or get it through your company it's expensive. Autodesk likes to vacuum up companies and tools then cludge them into different software packages which can cause instability/crashes depending on what you are doing with it, it's still industry standard though. If you've seen any blockbuster movie in the last 20 years you're looking at stuff made in Maya. Pixar movies are animated in Maya for the most part and rendered with Render Man.

You can do hard surface or organic modeling pretty easily in Modo and if you are familiar with Autodesk products you can set it to Maya controls and go. It isn't open source, but it is cheap. The full version is $$$$ but Modo Indie is $15/mo on Steam and comes with everything you need to print unless you are printing complex models with 100,001+ polygons. It's easy to export in OBJ plus check for manifold meshes/repair holes. Plus the Mesh Fusion functionality by itself is mind-blowing (basically real-time non-destructive live boolean operations, check the overview out on youtube.) The fact that you can get a software package with something like Mesh Fusion for $15/mo is pretty wild.

If you want to get up to speed quick check out Vaughan in 60 seconds/pixel fondue on youtube, William Vaughan is a Lightwave/Modo legend and has made tons of tutorials + makes new ones almost weekly. His books are stellar too and are software agnostic so instead of focusing on specific software he teaches the concepts that can be used for 3D in any program. Some disclosure: I worked with him and had him as an instructor and can't sing his praises enough. I'm also big into OSHW (worked at Lulzbot managing the print cluster, taught 250+ students the software and hardware pipeline + teaching about OSHW in the curriculum while managing the 3D printing lab for The Digital Animation & Visual Effects School, and currently work part-time for OSHWA.) It may not be open, but it does have open aspects and is built around OpenGl. If I could program I'd be all for helping a project to make an open version like Natron is to Nuke for compositing.