What should we make next?

Want to use the Open Source Hardware documentation to make your LulzBot 3D Printer do even more? Start here!
mikeyboyaz
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:29 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by mikeyboyaz » Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:31 pm

What about a powder or liquid pigment injecting system to color filament to any color so that only white and clear are necessary on the current line of models. Then just add a color code ?hex? to each write to make your prints any color combinations you want?

dsplawski
Posts: 37
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 7:16 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by dsplawski » Mon Feb 20, 2017 4:26 pm

1) I think there's a lot of potential in the i3 multi-material approach, but I'm not sold on the method of printing a waste tower to change colors. If there were an off bed location that the extruder could use to purge the old filament that would be ideal. I'm thinking of a system with a camera to ensure the color has changed completely and a little garburator that would chop up all the useless filament. Depending on the print this could save a lot of time, material and wear on the machine.
1a) Working PVA into the equation above would be ideal for printing dissolvable boundary layers for supports.

2)I've always thought it would be cool to be able to break the "layer by layer" printing process for FDM printing. Lets say you wanted to print an arch standing up. If you could print your support material for the arch first then print the entire arch using one fluid movement. You'd have to have a fairly low profile and long hot end as well as a fast Z-axis. I think this process would be much more beneficial for a continuous fiber printer like the Markforged offering, but who knows, it might work well for regular FDM materials as well.

3) Varislice logic built in to Cura

zorrobyte
Posts: 40
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 11:23 am

Re: What should we make next?

Post by zorrobyte » Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:11 pm

Filament runout accessory. Marlin already supports it.

Image

mylina
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:48 am

Re: What should we make next?

Post by mylina » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:50 am

geburges wrote:A small (size of the TAZ), inexpensive, open source CNC mill capable of working wood, plastic, aluminum, etc. Extra points for being able to work steel. :) Add-ons might include continuous liquid cooling and a forth axis.
Appreciated !
I Love my petty !!!

8097double4
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 6:44 am

Re: What should we make next?

Post by 8097double4 » Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:57 am

New Taz 6 + MOARstruder owner here - I should start by saying I'm super impressed by the machine and overall user experience. One look at the TAZ and you understand its potential.

I'm the type of user who follows the technology and its evolution, but am more interested in a machine's output capability + reliability than tinkering / troubleshooting. I would gladly pay a premium for the latest upgrades and modification in plug & play form, guaranteeing the Taz (sizable investment) a long usable life. A lot of these suggestions have already been made, but I'll echo them...

Plug & Play Upgrades:
1. A user friendly, LulzBot flavor of OctoPrint + Webcam + power kill that bolts to the machine
2. Filament Runout Detection
4. Specialty Extruders (Multicolor w/ Single Nozzle, Flexible + Rigid w/ Single Nozzle, EVENMOARstruder, Pellet Extruder)
5. Extended Y Axis for larger MOARstruder prints.

Software / Firmware:
1. Print recovery from power out
2. Broader filament support built into Cura
3. Refine multi-material print process
4. More infill and support options in Cura

Other:
1. Photogrammetry rig or handheld 3D scanner (like Artec Eva or Creaform Go!) + scan alignment solution
2. Collaborative Robot (like Universal Robots)

Nitrozeus
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri May 12, 2017 11:04 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by Nitrozeus » Fri May 12, 2017 11:08 pm

Build an SLA I think they will be the next craze. Also resin is becoming cheaper.

lkcl
Posts: 9
Joined: Fri May 19, 2017 8:17 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by lkcl » Fri May 19, 2017 8:55 pm

geburges wrote:A small (size of the TAZ), inexpensive, open source CNC mill capable of working wood, plastic, aluminum, etc. Extra points for being able to work steel. :) Add-ons might include continuous liquid cooling and a forth axis.
i've seen a $150 CNC from taobao, it was *real* basic, and amazingly was functional and useable. 8mm plastic all round (so was surprisingly heavy and surprisingly sturdy), for everything: could (and probably was) laser-cut. it used screw-threads for *all* axes with 2 nuts to stop backlash (you need the torque in a CNC) and it used a low-cost 300W motor which could easily do 10,000 RPM @ 48v. no end-stops (!!) because apparently you never use them anyway, you're supposed to position the spindle "by hand" to the stock material, then reset that as "zero-point", keeping it for each "pass".

the software was (and already is) entirely libre but is totally separate from the 3D printing stuff and is already well-established and well-known. forget the name right now.

it was *not* designed for metal: let's be absolutely clear about that. $150 for something that's made from thick sheet plastic will *not* get you a metal-cutting CNC :) but, heck, for a first-time experimental product to add to the lulzbot range, something as basic as this would be a pretty safe bet. just... please use trapezoidal lead screws and a planetary gearbox on each axis - screw-threads *shudder*.

klestor
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Dec 07, 2013 5:37 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by klestor » Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:57 pm

+1 for SLA printer and with the build volume of the TAZ

elgullitch
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:31 pm

Re: What should we make next?

Post by elgullitch » Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:18 am

A Universal Extruder Tool Head
Lulzbot has the standard extruder for rigid filament and the Flexystruder for flexible filament. This was fine 2 or 3 years ago, but the market has changed. There are now several designs for universal extruders that do a good job with all types of filaments (e.g. E3D Titan, BondTech, etc.).
Aleph needs to develop a simple, open-source, universal design that plays well in this space. This would make the Flexystruder obsolete but it will vastly improve the usability of all Lulzbot printers.

And while I'm on the subject, isn't it time to retire the Wades type extruder design? I recognize the importance of honoring the open-source legacy, but I have to believe that there are many better design options that are achievable even with the lowest common denominator of self-replicating technology. I have seen, designed, and built many variations on drive mechanisms, filament tensioners, and hotend mounts that are superior to the Wades design in weight, strength, durability, and performance.
Next Gen Extruder key features: Fully constrained filament path, adjustable filament drive pressure, low weight, high torque

It's time to up your game Aleph!

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piercet
Posts: 4028
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 1:37 am
Location: Battleground, WA
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Re: What should we make next?

Post by piercet » Sat Oct 07, 2017 4:04 pm

elgullitch wrote:
Sat Oct 07, 2017 7:18 am
A Universal Extruder Tool Head
Lulzbot has the standard extruder for rigid filament and the Flexystruder for flexible filament. This was fine 2 or 3 years ago, but the market has changed. There are now several designs for universal extruders that do a good job with all types of filaments (e.g. E3D Titan, BondTech, etc.).
Aleph needs to develop a simple, open-source, universal design that plays well in this space. This would make the Flexystruder obsolete but it will vastly improve the usability of all Lulzbot printers.

And while I'm on the subject, isn't it time to retire the Wades type extruder design? I recognize the importance of honoring the open-source legacy, but I have to believe that there are many better design options that are achievable even with the lowest common denominator of self-replicating technology. I have seen, designed, and built many variations on drive mechanisms, filament tensioners, and hotend mounts that are superior to the Wades design in weight, strength, durability, and performance.
Next Gen Extruder key features: Fully constrained filament path, adjustable filament drive pressure, low weight, high torque

It's time to up your game Aleph!
There's always this one!

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2169219

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