Chrysalis: Aluminum-Framed Enclosure for TAZ 6

After encountering some warping issues on my TAZ 6, I designed and built an enclosure to help keep the environment consistent. The electronics is outside of the enclosure and it fits the outside of the TAZ 6 like a glove. There are cutouts for all the protrusions on the frame including screws and the spool holder system. I’ve got two fan mounts for adding ventilation later and I’ve also got a couple of mount points for adding a spool holder on top if I want it.





The whole enclosure is designed in two sections to allow easy portability and so that I can remove the front if I need to get at the workings of the machine. There are also easily removable cutouts that provide handles on the enclosure for ease of transport. A large latched door is made of acrylic and there are two windows on top to allow light and visibility. But otherwise the outside is made of ABS connected together by V-Slot and Makerlink.

I’ve got full details of the build including design files and assembly instructions at the project page at: http://tenrec.builders/chrysalis/

I’ve also got the materials for a few extra enclosures, so if you want a kit of it that is ready to go, you can get one: https://store.diybookscanner.org/products/chrysalis-3d-printer-enclosure

Feel free to ask me any questions about the design. Or if you notice an inconsistency in the documentation or a way to improve the build, I’d love to hear about it.

-Jonathon Duerig

Hi
I currently run my TAZ6 in it’s open configuration.
The room is quite large but, because of it’s location in the room, it’s in a pretty dead air spot.
I’ve considered building an enclosure, just to normalize temperature when building large ABS projects.
My concern is that I do not wish to soften the ABS material used in the TAZ6 structure.

Question is: What is the temperature inside of your enclosure when running a multi-hour print with the bed set to about
110C and the extruder at 240C?

What I do now, is cover my completed print with paper towels and leave them sit on the print bed until they are cool.
I do pop the prints from the bed when bed temperature is at 50C, then I put the print back under the towels and leave them
sit for an hour or so.

I just did some measurements on a print that has been going for around 1.5 hours. I think at this point it is at a steady state in terms of temperature. I’ve got an IR thermometer which lets me get temperatures by shining it into the gap for filament at the top. I’ve got a 240 C extruder temperature and a 90 C bed temperatures (so a bit cooler than you).

Room temperature: 23 C
Hottest temperature on outside of enclosure (near gap at top): 33 C
Hottest temperature on pointing down at PEI bed: 80 C
Temperature on printed part (top layer, but not newly laid down): 60 C-70 C
Temperature on plastic parts of extruder: 45 C

Recommendations on ABS seem to be that it should be kept below 70 C for working temperature. The hottest plastic parts I could find (on the extruder) seem to be nowhere near that limit. So I’m fairly confident that I am not damaging my printer by enclosing it. It seems like it would only be a danger if you spent more effort to really seal up every crack or if you had a secondary heating element.

Out of curiosity, have you actually seen prints warp after the printing process is over? You take a lot of care with cooling post-print and it never occurred to me to do so. The only times I’ve noticed warping was mid-print and so whenever parts are done, I have just popped them off and started using them without worrying about cooling any more.

-Jonathon Duerig

Thanks for the research you did on your Enclosure Temperature.
I will find it useful when I build or buy and enclosure.

“Out of curiosity, have you actually seen prints warp after the printing process is over? You take a lot of care with cooling post-print and it never occurred to me to do so. The only times I’ve noticed warping was mid-print and so whenever parts are done, I have just popped them off and started using them without worrying about cooling any more.”

To answer your question concerning warping after the printing process;
When I first started 3D printing for myself, I almost gave up on ABS.
I understood that ABS shrinks quite a bit because of my experience with Vacuum Forming ABS.
When Vacuum forming, you need to get the parts off the tooling before it gets to cool, but not while it’s too hot.
After the Vacuum formed part is removed from the tool and allowed to cool to room temperature, it will not fit back on the tool.
The shrinkage is quite large.

Usually long parts, say about 200mm long will tend to warp if removed from the build plate while warm.
I’ve also had parts that were thin wall (say about 1mm thick wall) and over about 50mm tall crack after they are cool but are not cool when removed from the build plate.
When I use the paper towels in an attempt at removing the temperature gradients in the part before the part is too cool, most of my prints do not warp, crack or break mysteriously a few days after I’ve printed them.

The general idea is to attempt to get the entire 3D printed part to the temperature that the build plate is at.
Then allow the part to cool slowly.
This equalizes the internal stresses in the part.
At least that’s what I’ve come to believe.

Sorry about my long winded post, but it’s a topic I wish I would hear more about.

Thanks again for your enclosure temperature info.
Gary